Juan Soto, Julio Urias among stars to sign deals, avoid arbitration


Many MLB stars agreed to one-year deals on Friday, which is the deadline for teams and arbitration-eligible players to trade salary figures for the 2023 season.

Here are some of the more prominent deals that were agreed upon on Friday.

Juan Soto: One year, $23 million with the parents

The young superstar slugger was able to come to an agreement in his new home, agreeing to a price tag of $23 million through the 2023 season, ESPN reported.

Soto struggled a bit in his first few months in San Diego, but still had a solid season in 2022, hitting .242 with an .854 OPS to go along with 27 homers and 62 RBI last season.

The 24-year-old is still under club control until the end of the 2024 season, giving the two sides time to agree a long-term deal. But Soto already turned down a 15-year, $440 million extension from the Washington Nationals before being traded in July 2022.

Shohei Ohtani, Juan Soto and others make Southern California the best pool of talent in the MLB

Shohei Ohtani, Juan Soto and others make Southern California the best pool of talent in the MLB

Julio Urias: One year, $14.25 million with the Dodgers

Los Angeles was able to reach an arbitration-avoidance deal with arguably its best pitcher on Friday.

Urias has developed into one of the best lefties and pitchers in baseball over the past two seasons. He had a 2.16 ERA and a 17-7 record last season, a year after posting a 2.96 ERA and a 20-3 record.

The 26-year-old could earn himself a big payday in the next 12 months, as he will become a free agent at the end of the year unless the Dodgers extend him.

Josh Hader: One year, $14 million with the Padres

San Diego made a pair of costly deals to avoid arbitration on Friday. In addition to the deal they gave Soto, the Padres gave Hader the richest salary in arbitration history for a reliever.

The lefty was arguably the best reliever in baseball during his five-plus seasons with the Brewers, playing in the last four All-Star Games. However, he struggled in San Diego, allowing 13 earned runs in 16 innings pitched in 19 regular season appearances. However, he bounced back in the postseason as he didn’t allow a run and gave up just one hit in 5 ⅓ innings pitched.

Rhys Hoskins: One year, $12 million with the Phillies

Philadelphia was able to avoid going to arbitration with one of their best hitters.

The soon-to-be 30-year-old first baseman arguably had his best season in 2022, hitting .246 with a .794 OPS to go along with 30 homers and 79 RBI. Hoskins also hit six home runs in the postseason, including four in their five-game NLCS win over the Padres.

Hoskins can become a free agent after the 2024 season.

Philadelphia Phillies’ Rhys Hoskins talks to Ben Verlander after the win

Philadelphia Phillies' Rhys Hoskins talks to Ben Verlander after the win

Ben Verlander interviews Philadelphia Phillies’ Rhys Hoskins after punching his ticket to the World Series.

Lucas Giolito: One year, $10.4 million with the White Sox

The White Sox avoided going to arbitration with their ace on Friday.

They also expect the 28-year-old to have a bounce-back season in 2023. After three top-10 Cy Young finishes in 2019-21, Giolito went 11-9 with a 4.90 ERA in 2022.

Giolito can become a free agent in 2024.

Brandon Woodruff: One year, $10.8 million with the brewers

Arguably one of the best pitchers in the NL Central, Woodruff won’t have to go to arbitration. He was 13-4 with a 3.05 ERA last season, a year after going 9-10 with a 2.56 ERA that helped him finish fifth in the Cy Young voting. National League

Woodruff, who will turn 30 in February, is not eligible for free agency until 2025.

Jordan Montgomery: One year, $10 million with the cardinals

St. Louis gave his trade deadline acquisition an eight-figure deal to avoid arbitration.

Montgomery continued his strong season with the Cardinals after being traded from the Yankees at the 2022 trade deadline. He went 6-3 with a 3.11 ERA in 11 starts for St. Louis. He can become a free agent at the end of the season.

Walker Buehler: One year, $8.025 million with the Dodgers

The Dodgers ace might not pitch in 2023 after undergoing Tommy John Surgery, but he was still eligible for arbitration.

Buehler has been one of the best pitchers in baseball when healthy over the past few seasons, going 46-16 with a 3.02 ERA in 106 starts since 2017.

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